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The School of Data Journalism 2014!

Milena Marin - April 3, 2014 in Data Journalism, Events, Featured, School of Data

DJH_5 copy

We’re really excited to announce this year’s edition of the School of Data Journalism, at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, 30th April – 4th May.

It’s the third time we’ve run it (how time flies!), together with the European Journalism Centre, and it’s amazing seeing the progress that has been made since we started out. Data has become an increasingly crucial part of any journalists’ toolbox, and its rise is only set to continue. The Data Journalism Handbook, which was born at the first School of Data Journalism is Perugia, has become a go-to reference for all those looking to work with data in the news, a fantastic testament to the strength of the data journalism community.

As Antoine Laurent, Innovation Senior Project Manager at the EJC, said:

“This is really a must-attend event for anyone with an interest in data journalism. The previous years’ events have each proven to be watershed moments in the development of data journalism. The data revolution is making itself felt across the profession, offering new ways to tell stories and speak truth to power. Be part of the change.”

Here’s the press release about this year’s event – share it with anyone you think might be interested – and book your place now!


PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 3rd, 2014

Europe’s Biggest Data Journalism Event Announced: the School of Data Journalism

The European Journalism Centre, Open Knowledge and the International Journalism Festival are pleased to announce the 3rd edition of Europe’s biggest data journalism event, the School of Data Journalism. The 2014 edition takes place in Perugia, Italy between 30th of April – 4th of May as part of the International Journalism Festival.

#ddjschool #ijf13

A team of about 25 expert panelists and instructors from New York Times, The Daily Mirror, Twitter, Ask Media, Knight-Mozilla and others will lead participants in a mix of discussions and hands-on sessions focusing on everything from cross-border data-driven investigative journalism, to emergency reporting and using spreadsheets, social media data, data visualisation and mapping techniques for journalism.

Entry to the School of Data Journalism panels and workshops is free. Last year’s editions featured a stellar team of panelists and instructors, attracted hundreds of journalists and was fully booked within a few days. The year before saw the launch of the seminal Data Journalism Handbook, which remains the go-to reference for practitioners in the field.

Antoine Laurent, Innovation Senior Project Manager at the EJC said:

“This is really a must-attend event for anyone with an interest in data journalism. The previous years’ events have each proven to be watershed moments in the development of data journalism. The data revolution is making itself felt across the profession, offering new ways to tell stories and speak truth to power. Be part of the change.”

Guido Romeo, Data and Business Editor at Wired Italy, said:

“I teach in several journalism schools in Italy. You won’t get this sort of exposure to such teachers and tools in any journalism school in Italy. They bring in the most avant garde people, and have a keen eye on what’s innovative and new. It has definitely helped me understand what others around the world in big newsrooms are doing, and, more importantly, how they are doing it.”

The full description and the (free) registration to the sessions can be found on http://datajournalismschool.net You can also find all the details on the International Journalism Festival website: http://www.journalismfestival.com/programme/2014

ENDS

Contacts: Antoine Laurent, Innovation Senior Project Manager, European Journalism Centre: laurent@ejc.net Milena Marin, School of Data Programme Manager, Open Knowledge Foundation, milena.marin@okfn.org

Notes for editors

Website: http://datajournalismschool.net Hashtag: #DDJSCHOOL

The School of Data Journalism is part of the European Journalism Centre’s Data Driven Journalism initiative, which aims to enable more journalists, editors, news developers and designers to make better use of data and incorporate it further into their work. Started in 2010, the initiative also runs the website DataDrivenJournalism.net as well as the Doing Journalism with Data MOOC, and produced the acclaimed Data Journalism Handbook.

About the International Journalism Festival (www.journalismfestival.com) The International Journalism Festival is the largest media event in Europe. It is held every April in Perugia, Italy. The festival is free entry for all attendees for all sessions. It is an open invitation to listen to and network with the best of world journalism. The leitmotiv is one of informality and accessibility, designed to appeal to journalists, aspiring journalists and those interested in the role of the media in society. Simultaneous translation into English and Italian is provided.

About Open Knowledge (www.okfn.org) Open Knowledge, founded in 2004, is a worldwide network of people who are passionate about openness, using advocacy, technology and training to unlock information and turn it into insight and change. Our aim is to give everyone the power to use information and insight for good. Visit okfn.org to learn more about the Foundation and its major projects including SchoolOfData.org and OpenSpending.org.

About the European Journalism Centre (www.ejc.net) The European Journalism Centre is an independent, international, non-profit foundation dedicated to maintaining the highest standards in journalism in particular and the media in general. Founded in 1992 in Maastricht, the Netherlands, the EJC closely follows emerging trends in journalism and watchdogs the interplay between media economy and media culture. It also hosts each year more than 1.000 journalists in seminars and briefings on European and international affairs.

Dispatch: Crisismappers Community needs Data Makers

Heather Leson - November 25, 2013 in Data Journalism, Events, Open Data and My Data, Open Data Partnership For Development, WG Open Government Data, Workshop

What does open data / open knowledge have to do with Crisismapping? Everything. In times of crisis, we live in open data / open government ecosystem. We seek, build and make it happen in real time – talk converts to action quickly.

On Tuesday, November 19th, the School of Data hosted a full day pre-conference training session as part of the International Conference of Crisis Mappers Conference (ICCM) in Nairobi, Kenya. The full event hosted over 110 attendees from around the world for a training offering with Knowledge/Research, Maps to Data and Mobile/Security. The Crisismappers community brings humanitarians, governmental staff, civil society practitioners, researchers, and technologists in a common, equal space. Participants work on projects ranging from human rights, anti-corruption, humanitarian response and economic development in post-conflict zones. The brilliance of cross-sector community focused on using data for their work highlights the importance that Open Knowledge Foundation as an member of the greater network. Building a global network of data makers is a one-by-one task. Our goal is to have leaders train their colleagues thus widening a circle of sharing and collaboration.

Some recent examples of our communities connecting include: Open Spending Tree Map by Donor: Foreign Aid Transparency – Faith (Philippines) and Early Results – Micromappers Yolanda (uses Crowdcrafting which was incubated at OKFN Labs).

Baking Soda with Crisis Mappers

Steve and School of Data

(Steve Kenei, Development Initiatives)

Data is just a word until we activate it. I like to call the School of Data the “Baking Soda” team. Together with key ingredients (community, problem/issue description, data sets and tool menus), they work with others to make data usable and actionable.

School of Data in session (School of Data session at ihub for ICCM)

The data track workshop sessions including using spreadsheets, cleaning data, data visualization and how to geocode. Some folks stayed in this track all day, even skipping breaks. The track started with a spreadsheet training delivered by Steve Kenei from Development Initiatives, continued with an Introduction to OpenRefine and an introduction to data visualization by Agnes Rube of Internews Kenya. The track was finished by School of Data mentor Ketty Adoch. The workshop was designed to address issues that civil society organizations have using data. One of the exciting results was the sheer concentration and intent of participants. They skipped breaks and even brought their own datasets to guide their learning.

Communities, Ideas connecting:

Ketty Adour, Fruits of Thought

Ketty Adour, Fruits of Thought

The ICCM conference, including pre-conference events, was jam packed week of maps, data, research and technology. Most of the ignite talks and panels referred to some stage of open data needs or the issues ranging from data ethics, data quality and data collection methodology. Ketty Adour – one of this years ICCM fellows – she shared her experiences on building a community mapping in Uganda using OpenStreetMap at Fruits of Thought.

Next Steps

During the self-organized sessions, together with Luis Capelo of UN OCHA , I hosted a discussion about Open Data Opportunities and Challenges. It was an exercise for the attendees to discuss Open Data and Crisismapping.

We determined a few concrete actions for the community:

  • A common data sharing space for Crisismappers interested in Humanitarian data.
  • A Crisismappers Open Data Working Group to help share impact and build momentum.
  • Training and a mentorship programs to help build skills and leadership in the field.

The Crisismappers community is over 5000 members strong with a mailing list, webinar and NING site. Do consider joining this vibrant community of maps and data makers who are at the edge of what it takes to unite policy with sheer determined actions. Also see our various Working Groups and the Open Data Partnership for Development programme.

Some additional resources:

Launching Spending Stories: How much is it really?

Anders Pedersen - November 21, 2013 in Data Journalism, Featured, Open Spending, Releases

spendingstories

Spending Stories is a new way to put spending figures in their proper perspective. Developed by the Open Knowledge Foundation and Journalism++ with funding from the Knight Foundation, Spending Stories is an app that helps citizens and journalists understand and compare amounts in stories from the news.

When we hear that the UK’s school meals programme costs £6 million, what does that really mean? It means, for one thing, that it costs about a fifth of the annual spending on the monarchy.

Spending Stories draws out comparisons between amounts of money, giving users a context in which to understand how money is being spent across society while referencing the original news stories.

Users can enter a figure into Spending Stories and get a scale visualisation showing how it compares with spending stories from the app’s database.

£700,000: scale visualisation

The app displays the big picture, and users can then click through to a card visualisation that shows how the amount relates to specific stories.

£700,000: card visualisation

Users can filter stories to only show amounts that relate to the user’s interests, for example aid or energy.

Filtering stories

If users find news stories of interest, they can contribute these to the database in three easy steps and share them.

Contribute new data

Due to the good availability of UK spending data in OpenSpending, this first release of Spending Stories focuses on the UK. Spending Stories is, however, an open source project and can easily be forked and translated into other languages.

We hope to help Spending Stories sites launch on their own and expand with new features and local news stories. At launch, we are already in touch with Open Knowledge Foundation Japan about the potential deployment of Spending Stories in Japanese.

If you would like to know more about the options for setting up a local Spending Stories site, get in touch.

The European Journalism Centre Announces Free Online Data Journalism Course

Lucy Chambers - October 15, 2013 in Data Journalism, News

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for its free online data journalism course Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools.

This five-module introductory course gives participants the essential concepts, techniques and skills to effectively work with data and produce compelling stories under tight deadlines. It is open to anyone in the world with an Internet connection who wants to tell stories with data.

This EJC initiative is supported by Google, the Dutch Ministry of Education and the African Media Initiative, and features a stellar line-up of instructors and advisors from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism, the New York Times, ProPublica, Wired, Twitter, La Nacion Argentina, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Zeit Online, and others.

Josh Hatch, Senior Editor at The Chronicle of Higher Education and member of the Advisory Board for this course, says:

“Thanks to the European Journalism Centre’s work to foster data journalism’s move into the mainstream, reporters and editors can gain insights from the best in the business. Whether you want to get over your fear of Excel, learn the language of your data geeks, or discover how to tell stories with data visualisations, this course will help journalists and newsrooms learn how to take advantage of these invaluable skills. This is a very good thing.”

The course is planned to start early 2014 and the instruction language will be English. More details about the course and how to register are available at: www.datadrivenjournalism.net/course.

Can’t wait to get started? Refresh your skills by reading the European Journalism Centre and Open Knowledge Foundation’s earlier project, the Data Journalism Handbook before the course starts or stay in touch with happenings in the Data Journalism World via the Data Journalism Mailing List.

Open Assets in Argentina

Guest - September 30, 2013 in Data Journalism, Featured Project, Open Government Data

The following guest post is by Florencia Coelho, from Argentinian daily La Nacion.

In Argentina, where a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has yet to be signed, LA NACION and three transparency NGOs – Poder Ciudadano, ACIJ (Asociación Civil por la Igualdad y la Justicia) and Fundación Directorio Legislativo joined efforts to produce the first site to open information on the assets of public servants, making their asset declarations available online.

The first stage of the web site contains more than 600 asset declarations from public servants from each of the three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. Priority was given to data on key positions within each branch as well as data on candidates in the upcoming October 2013 legislative elections.

Each NGO specialized in monitoring transparency and accountability of certain branches, presenting the necessary public information requests and processing the data received.

The information requested was received in print copies; therefore, in addition to entering the data, the teams also scanned the original requests, erasing any sensitive personal information before uploading them to DocumentCloud where they are linked to each asset declaration on the web site.

Teams collaborated with more than 30 volunteers who manually entered the data and cross checked every unit of content in a marathon six-day “check-a-thon”. Throughout the project cycle, the teams worked online using collaborative tools like Google Docs, Google Spreadsheets and Trello.

The database and the web site were designed and developed by LA NACION data and multimedia teams from Lanacion.com. Our Knight Mozilla Opennews fellow collaborated in optimizing the application and search tools. This news application, now in beta, will open data in machine readable formats for everyone to reuse.

The Open Asset Declarations website is being launched in a particular political context. A new law was recently passed which omits asset information on public officials´ spouses and children, thereby reducing the content previously available. Family asset information is vital to depict an accurate picture of the public officials´ wealth and key to any investigation on illicit enrichment.

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A “Check-a-thon” last week, comparing paper originals of statements with spreadsheet versions*

The Data Journalism Handbook now available in French, Spanish and Russian

Jonathan Gray - August 22, 2013 in Data Journalism, Featured

Last year the Open Knowledge Foundation worked with the European Journalism Centre to publish the Data Journalism Handbook, a free, openly licensed reference book showing journalists how to use data to improve the news.

The fact that the book is openly licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike license has enabled various translation and localisation initiatives to bring its contents to new audiences around the world.

Today sees the release of a new French language edition, which is edited by our friend and co-conspirator Nicolas Kayser-Bril, co-founder of Journalism++, and published by Eyrolles.

The Data Journalism Handbook is freely available in English, Russian and now in French.

As well as translations of the original book chapters, the new edition includes recent examples of data journalism from French and Belgian outlets such as Le Monde, Rue89 and France Info. It is freely available online and the source code is on Github.

Editions of the handbook are also freely available in Russian and Spanish, and the European Journalism Centre is coordinating translations in Chinese, Arabic and Portuguese with local partners.

If you’re interested in data journalism you can join our data driven journalism mailing list, co-hosted with the European Journalism Centre.

Our chapter on ‘Covering the Public Purse with OpenSpending.org‘ in the French edition.

Using public data to flag tax avoidance schemes?

Jonathan Gray - July 11, 2013 in Data Journalism, Policy, Public Money, School of Data

This post was jointly written by Jonathan Gray (@jwyg), Director of Policy and Ideas at the Open Knowledge Foundation and Tony Hirst (@psychemedia), Data Storyteller at the Open Knowledge Foundation’s School of Data project. It is cross-posted from the School of Data blog.

Today OpenCorporates added a new visualisation tool that enables you to explore the global corporate networks of the six biggest banks in the US.

The visualisation shows relationships between companies that are members of large corporate groups.

You can hover over a particular company within a corporate group to highlight its links with other companies that either control or are controlled by the highlighted company. It also shows which companies are located in countries commonly held to be tax havens.

OpenCorporates control map example

As well as corporate ownership data, OpenCorporates also publishes a growing amount of information detailing company directorships. Mining this data can offer a complementary picture of corporate groupings.

The Offshore Leaks Database from The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, released earlier this year, also contains information about “122,000 offshore companies or trusts, nearly 12,000 intermediaries …, and about 130,000 records on the people and agents who run, own, benefit from or hide behind offshore companies”.

As you may have seen, we’ve recently been thinking about how all of this publicly available information about corporate ownership networks might be used to help identify potential tax avoidance schemes.

While the visualisation that OpenCorporates released today focuses on six corporate networks, we’d be interested in seeing whether we might be able to mine bigger public data sources to detect some of the most common tax avoidance schemes.

As more and more corporate data becomes openly available, might we be able to identify patterns within corporate groupings that could be indicative of tax avoidance schemes? What might these patterns look like? To what extent might you be able to use algorithms to flag certain corporate groupings for further attention? And to what extent are others (auditors, national tax authorities, or international fraud or corruption agencies) already using algorithmic techniques to assist with the detection of such arrangements?

There are several reasons that using open data and publicly available algorithms to detect potential tax avoidance schemes could be interesting.

Firstly, as tax avoidance is a matter of public concern arguably civil society organisations, journalists and citizens should be able to explore, understand and investigate potential avoidance, not just auditors and tax authorities.

Secondly, we might get a sense of how prevalent and widespread particular tax avoidance schemes are. Not just amongst high profile companies that have been in the public spotlight, but amongst the many other tens of millions of companies and corporate groupings that are publicly listed. The combination of automated flagging and collaborative investigations around publicly available data could be a very powerful one.

If you’re interested in looking into how data on corporate groupings might be used to flag possible tax avoidance schemes, then you can join us on the School of Data discussion list.



IRS: Turn Over A New Leaf, Open Up Data

Beth Noveck - May 24, 2013 in Data Journalism, Open Spending, Spending Stories

The following post is co-authored by Stefan Verhulst and Beth Noveck. It is cross-posted from Forbes.com. If you’d like to learn more about tax data, check out our data expedition on tax evasion and avoidance on the 6th June!


The core task for Danny Werfel, the new acting commissioner of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), is to repair the agency’s tarnished reputation and achieve greater efficacy and fairness in IRS investigations. Mr. Werfel can show true leadership by restructuring how the IRS handles its tax-exempt enforcement processes.

People filing tax forms at the IRS in 1920.

One of Mr. Werfel’s first actions on the job should be the immediate implementation of the groundbreaking Presidential Executive Order and Open Data policy, released last week, that requires data captured and generated by the government be made available in open, machine-readable formats. Doing so will make the IRS a beacon to other agencies in how to use open data to screen any wrongdoing and strengthen law enforcement.

By sharing readily available IRS data on tax-exempt organizations, encouraging Congress to pass a budget proposal that mandates release of all tax-exempt returns in a machine-readable format, and increasing the transparency of its own processes, the agency can begin to turn the page on this scandal and help rebuild trust and partnership between government and its citizens.

Every year in the United States approximately 1.5 million registered tax-exempt organizations file a version of the “Form 990” with the IRS and state tax authorities. The 990 collects details on the financial, governance and organizational structure of America’s universities, hospitals, foundations, and charities to the end of ensuring that they are deserving of tax exempt status. We are missing an opportunity to analyze this data so that decisions about whom to investigate can be based on evidence rather than conjecture, on patterns rather than prejudice.

Currently, hundreds of thousands of the largest tax-exempt organizations are required to file their returns electronically. The IRS should release this data in bulk as a free database immediately. If the IRS were to make these 990 data available in a form that could be easily downloadable and processed by computer programs for visualization and statistical analysis, researchers could quickly do more extensive, in-depth empirical research to better understand the sector and spot fraud, waste and abuse more systematically. Knowing who runs a nonprofit can help detect fraud. Attorneys General have occasionally found the same person collecting full time salaries from several different nonprofits.

Check out the guide on tax avoidance and evasion from OpenSpending to find out more about how to follow the money.

While the IRS is using robo-audits, catching large evasions still happens mainly by happenstance. With open data, they could be detected, first, through computer analysis. By using technology to expand the regulator’s toolkit, it becomes possible to target limited enforcement resources to where problems really are. The Securities and Exchange Commission has, for instance, developed an improved capacity to detect and prevent insider trading more effectively by making public information computable and easier to mine. In addition, open data creates the means for government and citizens to collaborate on spotting problems. As the adage goes, with many eyes, all bugs are shallow.

Similarly, Form 990 requires charities to disclose loans to or from current and former officers. Making these and other transactions that correlate with instances of fraud like these would save government resources at the state and federal levels.

With a 990 database, it would also be easier to run queries to understand which executives receive the highest compensation. By combining 990 and other data, such as lobbying data, it might become possible to spot impermissible political activities.

President Obama’s 2014 budget calls for requiring all tax exempts to file electronically, but also requires that the IRS makes these already public returns available in a timely, machine-readable format. These data would create a corpus of open, computable information that could be used to understand where nonprofits are providing services and where there are gaps. Enabling more people and organizations to analyze, visualize, and mash up the data, creating a large public community that is interested in the nonprofit sector and can collaborate to find ways to improve it.

In sum, the data that the IRS collect about nonprofit organizations present a great opportunity to learn about the sector and make it more effective.

Making IRS data open won’t solve every problem; the recent scandal has proven that the IRS must be more transparent about both the information it collects, but also how it manages that information. A commitment on day one to share the data it collects in a machine readable manner would show true leadership by Mr. Werfel and help solidify the Obama administration’s legacy as an open government.


Stefaan G. Verhulst is the Chief Research and Development Officer of the Governance Laboratory @NYU (GovLab) where he is responsible for building a research foundation on how to transform governance using advances in science and technology.

Beth Noveck is Founder and Director of the Governance Laboratory. She served in the White House as the first United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer and founder of the White House Open Government Initiative (2009-2011). She was appointed senior advisor for Open Government to the UK Prime Minister David Cameron. She is the author of “Wiki Government: How Technology Can Make Government Better, Democracy Stronger and Citizens More Powerful.”

Use Templates to Make News Apps Quickly

Esa Mäkinen - April 3, 2013 in Data Journalism

Screen Shot 2013-04-03 at 10.27.02

Coding is expensive and slow, journalism should be cheap and fast. This is the main problem I face as a data journalism producer.

My responsibility is to produce news apps for Helsingin Sanomat, a main daily newspaper in Finland. When there is a breaking news event, we have about five hours to come up with an idea, get the data and publish the news app.

In most cases it would be too slow to start from scratch.

To overcome this problem, we have been creating kind of a Style Book for data journalists. The Style Book contains a set of News App templates we can modify and publish very fast.

Ideally, we just insert new set of data to template and publish it. This can be done in five minutes, although it usually takes more time.

Common example of this approach is a map made with Google Fusion Tables. You can put your data into Fusion Table and have a working interactive map in less than ten minutes.

The templates we use are mainly built by our data desk. We try to make every new News App so generic that we can use it again as a template.

The Style Book is currently a page on our internal Wiki. All our journalists can access it from our intranet. It lists some 20 templates at this point.

Below, I’ve listed some of the templates we use. Links are to live versions of News Apps we’ve made using the templates.

Timeline. Based on TimelineJS, this is very fast way to show news as process. This particular example is about the crisis in Gaza.

Animated graph. Based on the Hype tool, this is a Flash-like animation to show almost any content. This particular example is the results about our questionnaire to racism scholars: how many of you have received threats because of your work.

Animated quotes. This is built by our data team. It shows a set of quotes in a loop.

Counter. When there are tax hikes, benefit cuts, etc., we can show the results of these changes to our individual reader. Just tell us your salary and some other details and we’ll tell you how this affects you. This example by our data team shows the effect of tax hike on electricity based on how much you use.

Interactive maps. This is perhaps the most common news app we publish. We use Leaflet to make our maps. This one shows how many children there are compared to kindergarden places in different regions of Helsinki.

Fourfold table. This is a tool to get opinions from our readers. We ask two dimensional question: Is the new Music Centre beautiful or ugly, necessary or unnecessary. If the question is good, this really gets audience. This example is about new stadium planned to be built in Helsinki.

Graphs. For standard graphs we use Datawrapper, Infogr.am and Tableau Public. Each has their merits and problems. All are quite fast to use. This example is about comparing supercomputers.

Forms. To ask questions from our readers. Google forms are good. We also use custom made tools when we want to have more contol over the visual side and time is not an issue. This example asks what kind of razor you use.

Scorecards. This is useful tool to present sports teams, companies, etc. as a user-friendly, sortable database. This example is about ice hockey teams in Finland.

Voting tools. If we want our readers to vote on some issue, we have a custom tool for that. This particular example is about proposals for a new bridge in Helsinki. Which one is best?

Roll-over images. A tool to show how things have changed in time. We overlay two images on top of each other and the user can roll them back and forth. This example is about old postcards: Helsinki 100 years ago and in present day.

Special layouts for web. The Helsingin Sanomat magazine has large features each month, and we publish some of them in web with special layouts. We use all of the templates we have in these versions. This example is about living a month as muslim.

If you are interested in our work, all our news apps can be found here:

http://www.hs.fi/aihe/datajournalismi

Bringing The Data Journalism Handbook to Brazilian Journalists

Liliana Bounegru - March 29, 2013 in Data Journalism

This post was written by Liliana Bounegru from the European Journalism Centre. It is cross-posted on DataDrivenJournalism.net.

As you may know, The Data Journalism Handbook is a free collaborative book that shows journalists how to use data to improve the news. When we first published it last year, we put out an open call to see if there were people interested in helping to translate the book into their language. The response was overwhelming. A couple of months later, we had over 400 registrants. Since then we’ve been hard at work to set up a global translation initiative – working with journalists, media organisations and universities to translate and localise the book for audiences around the world.

Today we are pleased to announce that a group of over 30 Brazilian journalists and students are translating the book into Portuguese. The project is coordinated by Brazil’s leading investigative journalism network, Abraji, with the support of the European Journalism Centre (EJC).

“Since its foundation, ten years ago, Abraji has been working hard to expand CAR and data journalism in Brazil. So, it’s almost an obligation and certainly an honour for us to help translate The Data Journalism Handbook to Portuguese. Brazilian journalists will gain a lot,” says José Roberto de Toledo, Abraji vice-president and pioneer of CAR in Brazil.

Abraji and EJC will be working closely with the recently announced Iberoamerican Data Journalism Handbook, which will be building on our Data Journalism Handbook to produce a guide specifically targeted at a Latin American audience.
Three other translations, into Arabic, Chinese and Spanish, are in progress and will be published later this year. The book has already been translated into Russian.

If your media organisation is interested in coordinating a translation into your local language, we’d love to hear from you.

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