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New Open Knowledge Initiative on the Future of Open Access in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Jonathan Gray - October 21, 2014 in OKF Projects, Open Access, Open Humanities, Open Research, WG Humanities

This post is part of our Open Access Week blog series to highlight great work in Open Access communities around the world.

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To coincide with Open Access Week, Open Knowledge is launching a new initiative focusing on the future of open access in the humanities and social sciences.

The Future of Scholarship project aims to build a stronger, better connected network of people interested in open access in the humanities and social sciences. It will serve as a central point of reference for leading voices, examples, practical advice and critical debate about the future of humanities and social sciences scholarship on the web.

If you’d like to join us and hear about new resources and developments in this area, please leave us your details and we’ll be in touch.

For now we’ll leave you with some thoughts on why open access to humanities and social science scholarship matters:

“Open access is important because it can give power and resources back to academics and universities; because it rightly makes research more widely and publicly available; and because, like it or not, it’s beginning and this is our brief chance to shape its future so that it benefits all of us in the humanities and social sciences” – Robert Eaglestone, Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought, Royal Holloway, University of London.

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“For scholars, open access is the most important movement of our times. It offers an unprecedented opportunity to open up our research to the world, irrespective of readers’ geographical, institutional or financial limitations. We cannot falter in pursuing a fair academic landscape that facilitates such a shift, without transferring prohibitive costs onto scholars themselves in order to maintain unsustainable levels of profit for some parts of the commercial publishing industry.” Dr Caroline Edwards, Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature, Birkbeck, University of London and Co-Founder of the Open Library of Humanities

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“If you write to be read, to encourage critical thinking and to educate, then why wouldn’t you disseminate your work as far as possible? Open access is the answer.” – Martin Eve, Co-Founder of the Open Library of Humanities and Lecturer, University of Lincoln.

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“Our open access monograph The History Manifesto argues for breaking down the barriers between academics and wider publics: open-access publication achieved that. The impact was immediate, global and uniquely gratifying–a chance to inject ideas straight into the bloodstream of civic discussion around the world. Kudos to Cambridge University Press for supporting innovation!” — David Armitage, Professor and Chair of the Department of History, Harvard University and co-author of The History Manifesto

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“Technology allows for efficient worldwide dissemination of research and scholarship. But closed distribution models can get in the way. Open access helps to fulfill the promise of the digital age. It benefits the public by making knowledge freely available to everyone, not hidden behind paywalls. It also benefits authors by maximizing the impact and dissemination of their work.” – Jennifer Jenkins, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Director, Center for the Study of the Public Domain, Duke University

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“Unhappy with your current democracy providers? Work for political and institutional change by making your research open access and joining the struggle for the democratization of democracy” – Gary Hall, co-founder of Open Humanities Press and Professor of Media and Performing Arts, Coventry University

Global Open Data Index: Week 13 -17 October

Mor Rubinstein - October 17, 2014 in Global Open Data Index

Skærmbillede 2014-10-17 kl. 12.02.12

This is your week-by-week update of progress on the Global Open Data Index 2014. You can check for the most recent country submissions here. We’re now welcoming your participation in sprints across all countries for the month of October, concluding with a ‘Global Madness’ sprint on 30 October.

We’re making great progress – thank you so much for participating.

We are looking for help with these countries – can you help?

Armenia, Australia, New Zealand, Croatia, Estonia, Botswana, Haiti Honduras, Japan, South Korea, Lithuania, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Tajikistan

Feel free to send in your tips, contacts, organisations for these countries that we can contact to Mor.Robinstein (a) okfn (dot) org

Next week (week beginning 20 October): Mor Rubinstein, Community Coordinator for the Global Open Data Index is offering office hours in regional time zones where she is available to answer your questions and talk you through how to contribute to the Index.

Office hours

  • Monday 20 Oct – 13:00-15:00 GMT / 15:00–19:00 CEST/ 16:00–20:00 EEST
  • Tuesday 21 Oct – 15:00-19:00 GMT / 10:00–14:00 EST
  • Wednesday 22 Oct – 8:00-12:00 GMT / 16:00–20:00 CST / 17:00–21:00 JST / 13:30–17:30 IST
  • Friday 23 Oct – 10:00-15:00 GMT / 12:00–17:00 EAT

Skype – mor.rubinstein , IRC : #OKFN irc.freenode.net, Twitter #openindex14

This Index is yours!

Heather Leson - October 9, 2014 in Community, Open Data, Open Data Census, Open Data Census, Open Data Index

How is your country doing with open data? You can make a difference in 5 easy steps to track 10 different datasets. Or, you can help us spread the word on how to contribute to the Open Data Index. This includes the very important translation of some key items into your local language. We’ll keep providing you week-by-week updates on the status of the community-driven project.

We’ve got a demo and some shareable slides to help you on your Index path.

Priority country help wanted

The amazing community provided content for over 70 countries last year. This year we set the bar higher with a goal of 100 countries. If you added details for your country last year, please be sure to add any updates this year. Also, we need some help. Are you from one of these countries? Do you have someone in your network who could potentially help? Please do put them in touch with the index team – index at okfn dot org.

DATASETS WANTED: Armenia, Bolivia, Georgia, Guyana, Haiti, Kosovo, Moldova, Morocco, Nicaragua, Ukraine, and Yemen.

Video: Demo and Tips for contributing to the Open Data Index

This is a 40 minute video with some details all about the Open Data Index, including a demo to show you how to add datasets.

Text: Tutorial on How to help build the Open Data Index

We would encourage you to download this, make changes (add country specific details), translate and share back. Please simply share on the Open Data Census Mailing List or Tweet us @okfn.

Thanks again for sharing widely!

Connect and Help Build the Global Open Data Index

Heather Leson - October 1, 2014 in Community, Events, Open Data Census, Open Data Index

Earlier this week we announced that October is the Global Open Data Index. Already people have added details about open data in Argentina, Colombia, and Chile! You can see all the collaborative work here in our change tracker. Each of you can make a difference to hold governments accountable for open data commitments plus create an easy way for civic technologies to analyze the state of open data around the world, hopefully with some shiny new data viz. Our goal at Open Knowledge is to help you shape the story of Open Data. We are hosting a number of community activities this month to help you learn and connect with each other. Most of all, it is our hope that you can help spread the word in your local language.

Open Data Index @ OkFest 14

Choose your own adventure for the Global Open Data Index

We’ve added a number of ways that you can get involved to the OKFN Wiki. But, here are some more ways to learn and share:

Community Sessions – Let’s Learn Together

Join the Open Knowledge Team and Open Data Index Mentors for a session all about the Global Open Data Index. It is our goal to show open data around the world. We need your help to add data from your region and reach new people to add details about their country.

We will share some best practices on finding and adding open dataset content to the Open Data Index. And, we’ll answer questions about the use of the Index. There are timeslots to help people connect globally.

These will be recorded. But, we encourage you to join us on G+ /youtube and bring your ideas/questions. Stay tuned as we may add more online sessions.

Community Office Hours

Searching for datasets and using the Global Open Data Index tool is all the better with a little help from mentors and fellow community members. If you are a mentor, it would be great if you could join us on a Community Session or host some local office hours. Simply add your name and schedule here.

Mailing Lists and Twitter

The Open Data Index mailing list is the main communication channel for folks who have questions or want to get in touch: https://lists.okfn.org/mailman/listinfo/open-data-census#sthash.HGagGu39.dpuf For twitter, keep an eye on updates via #openindex14

Translation Help

What better way to help others get involved than to share in your own language. We could use your help. We have some folks translating content into Spanish. Other priority languages are Yours!, Arabic, Portuguese, French and Swahili. Here are some ways to help translate:

Learn on your own

We know that you have limited time to contribute. We’ve created some FAQs and tips to help you add datasets on your own time. I personally like to think of it as a data expedition to check the quality of open data in many countries. Happy hunting and gathering! Last year I had fun reviewing data from around the world. But, what matters is that you have local context to review the language and data for your country. Here’s a quick screenshot of how to contribute:

Steps to track Open Data

Thanks again for making Open Data Matter in your part of the world!


(Photo by Marieke Guy, cc by license (cropped))

Newsflash! OKFestival Programme Launches

Beatrice Martini - June 4, 2014 in Events, Free Culture, Join us, Network, News, OKFest, OKFestival, Open Access, Open Data, Open Development, Open Economics, Open Education, Open GLAM, Open Government Data, Open Humanities, Open Knowledge Foundation, Open Knowledge Foundation Local Groups, Open Research, Open Science, Open Spending, Open Standards, Panton Fellows, Privacy, Public Domain, Training, Transparency, Working Groups

At last, it’s here!

Check out the details of the OKFestival 2014 programme – including session descriptions, times and facilitator bios here!

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We’re using a tool called Sched to display the programme this year and it has several great features. Firstly, it gives individual session organisers the ability to update the details on the session they’re organising; this includes the option to add slides or other useful material. If you’re one of the facilitators we’ll be emailing you to give you access this week.

Sched also enables every user to create their own personalised programme to include the sessions they’re planning to attend. We’ve also colour-coded the programme to help you when choosing which conversations you want to follow: the Knowledge stream is blue, the Tools stream is red and the Society stream is green. You’ll also notice that there are a bunch of sessions in purple which correspond to the opening evening of the festival when we’re hosting an Open Knowledge Fair. We’ll be providing more details on what to expect from that shortly!

Another way to search the programme is by the subject of the session – find these listed on the right hand side of the main schedule – just click on any of them to see a list of sessions relevant to that subject.

As you check out the individual session pages, you’ll see that we’ve created etherpads for each session where notes can be taken and shared, so don’t forget to keep an eye on those too. And finally; to make the conversations even easier to follow from afar using social media, we’re encouraging session organisers to create individual hashtags for their sessions. You’ll find these listed on each session page.

We received over 300 session suggestions this year – the most yet for any event we’ve organised – and we’ve done our best to fit in as many as we can. There are 66 sessions packed into 2.5 days, plus 4 keynotes and 2 fireside chats. We’ve also made space for an unconference over the 2 core days of the festival, so if you missed out on submitting a proposal, there’s still a chance to present your ideas at the event: come ready to pitch! Finally, the Open Knowledge Fair has added a further 20 demos – and counting – to the lineup and is a great opportunity to hear about more projects. The Programme is full to bursting, and while some time slots may still change a little, we hope you’ll dive right in and start getting excited about July!

We think you’ll agree that Open Knowledge Festival 2014 is shaping up to be an action-packed few days – so if you’ve not bought your ticket yet, do so now! Come join us for what will be a memorable 2014 Festival!

See you in Berlin! Your OKFestival 2014 Team

Introducing the new Open Development Toolkit site!

Zara Rahman - June 3, 2014 in OKF Projects, Open Development

Open Development Toolkit screenshot

We’re very happy to launch today a new website for the Open Development Toolkit, which which includes a number of new features to help people make use of, and contribute to, the project.

When the project began in early 2014, the project brief was fairly open; since then, after speaking to various members of the Open Development community, attending events such as the IATI TAG meeting, and doing a thorough assessment of what is already going on in the community, we’ve narrowed down the project aims, and target audience, considerably. With regards to the target audience, we’re now considering two main, broad demographics: data users, and development agencies/donors.

By ‘data users’, we’re considering primarily infomediaries in aid recipient countries; civil society and journalists, who could be using development data in their work. They’re in a position to be able to understand the data with local context, and convey their findings to their communities in an effective way. We want to make it as easy as possible for them to find and use aid data portals that already exist, as well as develop their technical skills in accessing, and using, raw aid data to facilitate their work.

With regards to development agencies and donors, we’re looking specifically at those who are thinking of making their data available online; rather than building new portals from scratch and creating proprietary tools, we’d like to encourage them to build upon what has already been created, share and take into account lessons learned, and contribute to the community with their tool/portal creation. Especially where tools have been built with public funds (eg. development arms of governments) we see no reason for these tools to remain closed source and proprietary.

Tools

The new site includes a curated list of Tools, which allow the user to understand, visualise or access aid data in various ways. Each ‘Tool’ presented on the site with a short description of what it does, along with its main strengths and weaknesses, and each one is classified with a number of tags, stating the perceived skill level required (beginner, intermediate, or advanced), the data source used by the tool, as well as its ‘theme’ (eg. global overview, donor specific, recipient country, donor government). The tagging system allows users to search for tools by what they’re wanting to focus on – for example, looking into the activities of a certain donor agency, or taking a closer look at projects taking place in a particular aid recipient country.

Each tool also has a second tab, explaining how the tool was made. We’re putting special focus on the tools which are already open source, and by putting the name of the developer(s) who have worked on these tools along with their contact details, we hope to make it as easy as possible for more work to be commissioned which will build upon their expertise.

Community

Another focus of the site is to bring together people who have worked on building the tools from a technical perspective, along with people working in development agencies, and the potential users of the data; the whole ‘development data’ ecosystem, in a way.

On the Community page, anyone active in the Open Development space is encouraged to create a profile, (for now, via filling in this Google form), with their contact details and a short biography, either as an individual or as an organisation. Activities of organisations and individuals can be seen on their profile pages, for example, tools that they have built or contributed to, blog posts that they have written, and people/organisations with whom they have collaborated.

We hope that highlighting the work that people have done within the Open Development community, along with their collaborations, will facilitate further collaboration, and encourage organisations to call upon community expertise when developing new tools.

Training

As well as displaying the tools and work that have already been created within the community and encouraging collaboration, we also want to support civil society and journalists to get the skills they need to use development data in their work, as mentioned above. We’ll be doing this by working with School of Data to create an Aid Curriculum, made up of various modules on technical skills required to work with aid data.

Ideally, we’d like to build upon training materials that have already been created in the sector, and make them available for remixing and reuse by others in the future; we’ll be encouraging people to try them out in workshops and training sessions, and we’d love to get feedback on how they have best been used, so we can iterate and improve upon them in the future. The curriculum will also be available online for people to work through at their own pace.

Blog

Last, but not least – the site includes a blog, where we’ll be posting on topics such as uses of development data by civil society or journalists, lessons learned during the software development of data portals, and other issues surrounding data use within the global development sector. We welcome submissions to the blog – take a look here to see other topics, and how to contribute.

Feedback on the site is most welcome – either open an issue on Github or drop an email to zara@opendevtoolkit.net.

Bonding with Hong Kong and upcoming Open Spending

Heather Leson - May 16, 2014 in Events, Featured, OKF Hong Kong, Open Spending

Learning and sharing across the global Open Knowledge community are the two core purposes of our regular Community Sessions.

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This week Mart van de Ven and Bastien Douglas joined us to share all about the Open Data Hong Kong community.

Some of the key lessons they advised are: ask your community for help more, have regular events, translation is key and be ready for longer term engagement. Mart, Bastien and the ODHK folks: Have a great Longitudinal Hack!

See more about Open Data Hong Kong.

Next Community Session: All about OpenSpending

Around the world, citizens are getting involved in OpenSpending. So, far there are OpenSpending activities in 66 countries resulting in 735 datasets and 25207863 entries.

Join Anders Pedersen, Community Manager for OpenSpending to learn more about this project and how you can get involved.

  • Date: Wednesday, May 28. 2014
  • Time: 10:00 – 11:00 EDT/14:00-15:00 UTC (See worldtimebuddy.com for your timezone)
  • How to Register (G+)

Join the OpenSpending community See some Spending Stories.

We will record this.

NOTE: We are booking June 2014 Community Sessions. Contact heatherDOTleson AT OKFN DOT org if you have an idea, discussion or skillshare.

Talk soon!

We need you! Become a School of Data Fellow

Milena Marin - May 9, 2014 in Featured, School of Data

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Got data skills to share? Member of a community that wants to turn data into information? Know about a data journalism or civic activism project or organisation which need a push for using data more effectively? The School of Data needs you! We are currently broadening our efforts to spread data skills around the world, and people like you are crucial in this effort: new learners need guidance and people to help them along the way. Stand out and become a **School of Data Fellow**.

We are looking for people fitting the following profile:

  • Data savvy: has experience working with data and a passion for teaching data skills.

  • Understands the role of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and media in bringing positive change through advocacy, campaigns, and storytelling. Fellows are passionate about enabling partners to use data effectively through training and ongoing support.

  • Interested or experienced in working with journalism and/or civil society.

  • Has some facilitation skills and enjoys community-building (both online and offline).

  • Eager to learn from and be connected with an international community of data enthusiasts

As a School of Data fellow, you will receive data and leadership training, as well as coaching to organise events and build your community. You will also be part of a growing global network of School of Data practitioners, benefiting from the network effects of sharing resources and knowledge and contributing to our understanding about how best to localise our training efforts.

You will be part of a six-month training programme where we expect you to work with us for an average of five days a month, including attending online and offline trainings, organising events, and being an active member of the School of Data community.

There are up to 10 fellowship positions open for the July to December 2014 School of Data training programme.

We have current collaborations and resourcing confirmed to support fellows from the following countries: Romania, Hungary, South Africa, Indonesia, and Tanzania. We are also able to consider applicants for the remaining 5 places in this round from countries meeting these criteria:

  • The country falls under lower income, lower-middle income or upper-middle income categories as classified here.

  • There is demand from civil society organisations and/or journalists who wish to benefit from such a scheme.

  • There are some interesting datasets available in the country which would be worth exploring further. These could either be data published by a government or organisation or data collected by an organisation for their own internal use. Digitised or non-digitised—anything goes! We’re keen for a variety of challenges and want the fellows’ help to adapt teaching techniques to a variety of situations.

Our goal is to have global fellows from a wide mix of these countries. Don’t see your country listed? Keep reading to learn how you can get involved!

Got questions? See more about the Fellowship Programme here and have a looks at this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page. If this doesn’t answer your question, email us on schoolofdata@okfn.org

Not sure if you fit the profile? Have a look at who is a fellow now!

Convinced? Apply now to become a School of data fellow. The application will be open until the 1st of June 2014 and the programme will start in July 2014.

Take a CKAN Tour

Heather Leson - May 1, 2014 in CKAN, Events, OKF Projects

From baby name datasets and apps via the South Australian government to new City of Surrey, B.C., (Canada) site, there are many instances of CKAN around the world. CKAN is the data management system that makes data accessible – by providing tools to streamline publishing, sharing, finding and using data. It is used by various levels of governments, civil societies and organization to make their data transparent and available.

In this 1-hour video hangout Irina Bolychevsky, Services Director gives us an overview of CKAN with live demo’s of several CKAN sites including data.gov.uk, publicdata.eu and data.glasgow.gov.uk. She also answered community questions.

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Get Involved

CKAN has a wide community of contributors working to remix and extend the software. Two examples of code that folks have contributed includes Ckanext-spatial and ckanext-realtime (github links).

The CKAN core committers host regular online developer meetings. These are every Tuesday and Thursday 13:00 – 14: 00 EDT reviewing pull requests and discussing architecture. We meet up on ckan developer mailing list, being on the #ckan irc channel in freenode (to the the google hangout link for meetings!) and commenting on github tickets. All welcome.

Community questions tend to be asked on StackOverflow using the CKAN tag on Stack Overflow. You can also file issues/contribute code on github.

Contact us

If you want to talk about CKAN development, please come and say hi on the ckan-dev mailing list or the #ckan IRC channel on irc.freenode.org. If you have service inquiries, you can reach out to the team: services at ckan dot org

Upcoming Community Sessions: CKAN, Community Feedback

Heather Leson - April 28, 2014 in CKAN, Events, Network, Open Knowledge Foundation Local Groups, Our Work, Working Groups

Happy week! We are hosting two Community Sessions this week. You have expressed an interest in learning more about CKAN. As well, We are continuing our regular Community Feedback sessions.

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Take a CKAN Tour:

This week we will give an overview and tour of CKAN – the leading open source open data platform used by the national governments of the US, UK, Brazil, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Austria and many more. This session will cover why data portals are useful, what they provide and showcase examples and best practices from CKAN’s varied user base! Bring your questions on how to get started and best practices.

Guest: Irina Bolychevsky, Services Director (Open Knowledge) Questions are welcome via G+ or Twitter.

  • Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
  • Time: 7:30 PT /10:30 ET /14:30 UTC /15:30 BST/16:30 CEST
  • Duration: 1 hour
  • Register and Join via G+ (The Hangout will be recorded.)
Community Feedback Session

We promised to schedule another Community Feedback Session. It is hard to find a common time for folks. We will work on timeshifting these for next sessions. This is a chance to ask questions, give input and help shape Open Knowledge.

Please join Laura, Naomi and I for the next Community Feedback Session. Bring your ideas and questions.

  • Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
  • Time:9:00 PT/12:00EDT/16:00 UTC /17:00 BST/18:00 CEST
  • Duration:1 hour
  • Join via Meeting Burner

We will use Meeting Burner and IRC. (Note: We will record both of these.)

How to join meeting Burner: Audio instructions Option 1 Dial-in to the following conference line: Number 1- (949) 229 – 4400 # Option 2 You may join the conference bridge with your computer’s microphone/speakers or headset

How to join IRC: http://wiki.okfn.org/How_to_use_IRC/_Clients_and_Tips

More about the new Open Knowledge Brand

Host a Community Session in May

We are booking Community Sessions for May. These Open Knowledge online events can be in a number of forms: a scheduled IRC chat, a community google hangout, a technical sprint or an editathon. The goal is to connect the community to learn and share their stories and skills. If you would like to suggest a session or host one, please contact heather dot leson at okfn dot org.

More details about Community Sessions

(Photo: Heather Leson (San Francisco))

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