Blog

Petition the White House to Open Up Publicly Funded Research

John Wilbanks, co-author of the Panton Principles and past OKFN Advisory Board Member, just launched a petition to ask the White House to mandate free access to publicly funded research in the US. Here’s what it says: We believe in the power of the Internet to foster innovation, research, and education. Requiring the published results […]

Introducing our Panton Fellows!

  The Panton Fellowships are a new initiative to support scientists who promote open access to data. Funded by Open Society Foundations, the Open Knowledge Foundation are proud to welcome Ross Mounce and Sophie Kershaw as the first ever Panton Fellows. ##What are the Panton Fellowships? Many scientists believe in the benefits of open data. […]

#OpenDataEDB: the results

Last night was the first OKFN Meet-Up in Scotland* at the Ghillie Dhu, Edinburgh, run in collaboration with DevCSI. 19 people attended from around the city and nearby, including Glasgow, and those visiting for the Open Biblio Sprint represented Cambridge, London, Wolverhampton and the Netherlands. The Auditorium was a beautiful venue, and there was a […]

Panton Fellowships – Apply by 24th February!

The following post is by Laura Newman, a Community Coordinator at the Open Knowledge Foundation and Coordinator of the Panton Fellowships. Funding for scientists who promote open data. £8,000 over one year, plus a small discretionary budget for travel and related expenses. How would you promote open data in science? See the Panton Principles’ website […]

Panton Fellowships – apply now!

The Open Knowledge Foundation are delighted to announce the launch of the Panton Fellowships! Funded by Open Society Foundations, Panton Fellowships will be awarded to scientists who actively promote open data in science. Visit the Panton Fellowships home page for more information including details of how to apply Further Details We firmly believe that “open […]

Update from the Open Science Working Group

This week’s Working Group update comes from our Open Science group – thanks to Jenny Molloy for the post and for her great work coordinating the group! This follows on the recent updates from the Archaeology and EU Data groups – and next week we’ll have another… The open data in science working group have […]

Open Data Means Better Science

The following post is by Jenny Molloy, coordinator of the Open Science Working Group at the Open Knowledge Foundation. We are very pleased to announce the publication of an article detailing the working group’s aims and achievements in PLoS Biology’s Community Pages. ‘The Open Knowledge Foundation: Open Data Means Better Science‘ has already had over […]

Data Debate: Is transparency bad for science?

The following post is by Eve Jackson who works for the Index on Censorship. Is the push for openness helping or hindering science? Index on Censorship will be debating the question on Tuesday 6 December at 6.30pm at Imperial College London, with Sir Mark Walport (Director, Wellcome Trust), George Monbiot (columnist, the Guardian), Professor David […]

Two Open Knowledge Events in Cape Town: Africa@Home and Open Knowledge Meetup

The following post is by Francois Grey and Rufus Pollock. Francois is a recent Shuttleworth Fellow, visiting professor at Tsinghua University working and coordinator of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre. Rufus is a co-Founder of the Open Knowledge Foundation. There are two exciting open data and open knowledge events in Cape Town South Africa taking place […]

Keynoting at the OGD Camp … Carl-Christian Buhr!

We’re pleased to reveal that Carl-Christian Buhr, from the European Comission, will be joining us at OGD Camp, to make a presentation including a video address from Neelie Kroes! ###About Carl-Christian Carl-Christian Buhr, an economist and computer scientist by training, is a member of the cabinet of Neelie Kroes, the Digital Agenda Commissioner and EU […]

Rufus Pollock on Open Science

The following guest post is by Maria Neicu, who’s studying at the University of Amsterdam. She’s a member of the OKF’s Working Group on Open Data in Science. Rufus Pollock of the Open Knowledge Foundation recently gave a video interview on the topic of open science. Here are the videos, and summaries of what he […]

New EU consultation on open access to scientific information

The following post is from Jonathan Gray, Community Coordinator at the Open Knowledge Foundation. The European Commission has recently announced a consultation on access to scientific information. If you’re interested in open data in science (e.g. as per the Panton Principles for open data in science), then we’re sure the EC would love to hear […]

Guardian piece on open data in science

The following post is from Jonathan Gray, Community Coordinator at the Open Knowledge Foundation. The Guardian recently published an interesting article on open data in science, including interviews with OKF Co-Founder Rufus Pollock and other leading voices from the world of open science. Here’s Rufus: “The litmus test of openness is whether you can have […]

Voluntary Transparency And Digital Civic Literacy Help Build Strong Communities

The following guest post is by Matt Rosenberg of Seattle, founder of the non-profit Public Eye Northwest and the news knowledge base site Public Data Ferret, a Seattle Times local news partner. There’s no dispute that mandated public disclosure in accordance with freedom of information and open meetings laws is a cornerstone of any modern […]

Introducing FigShare: a new way to share open scientific data

The following post is from Mark Hahnel, founder of the Science 3.0 network and member of the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Working Group on Open Data in Science. Scientific publishing as it stands is an inefficient way to do science on a global scale. A lot of time and money is being wasted by groups around […]

The Power of Open Data

The following guest post is from David Bollier, independent policy strategist, journalist, and author of Viral Spiral. It was originally posted at the On the Commons blog. Science has always recognized the power of sharing in developing new knowledge. But in the search for treatments and cures for diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, the sprawling […]

Introducing the Panton Papers

Peter Murray-Rust — Cambridge University chemist, Open Knowledge Foundation Advisory Board member and tireless advocate for open data in chemistry — has recently started a series of blog posts about open data, focusing on issues related to the Panton Principles for open data in science. The first is called Open Data: why I need the […]

Pollen data in the New and Old World

The following guest post is from Stefano Costa at the University of Siena. He is Founder of the IOSA initiative and Coordinator of the Open Knowledge Foundation‘s Working Group on Open Data in Archaeology. Stefano wishes to thank Thomas Kluyver and David Jones for their help in reviewing the post. Since the 19th century, the […]

Panton Principle authors win SPARC Innovator prize!

We are delighted to announce that the authors of the Panton Principles have been awarded the SPARC Innovator prize! The principles are currently maintained by the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Working Group on Open Data in Science. From the announcement: Science is based on building on, reusing, and openly criticizing the published body of scientific knowledge. […]

Open Science Summit 2010, July 29-31, Berkeley

The following guest post is from Joseph Jackson, one of the main organisers behind the Open Science Summit. Dear Champions of Open Science, Please join us in gathering stakeholders seeking to liberate our scientific and technological commons to enable a new era of decentralized, distributed innovation. http://opensciencesummit.com/ While there are many great organizations and talented […]

Some final – and future – thoughts on the BioMed Central Open Data award

The following guest post is from Iain Hrynaszkiewicz who is Managing Editor at leading open access publisher BioMed Central and a member of the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Working Group on Open Data in Science. Having already been scooped by some encouraging and eloquent activity in the open data blogosphere here, here, here and here (perhaps […]

BioMed Central Open Data Award: winner to be announced this week!

The following guest post is from Iain Hrynaszkiewicz who is Managing Editor at leading open access journal BioMed Central and a member of the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Working Group on Open Data in Science. All followers of this blog will know that science publishing now goes much beyond the traditional, IMRaD, journal article. As collective […]

A tour of climate data at CKAN

The following guest post is by David Jones who is, among other things, a curator of the climate data group on CKAN (the OKF’s open source registry of open data) and co-founder of Clear Climate Code (which was previously featured on our blog here and here). Take a tour of some of the additions we’ve […]

Launch of the Panton Principles for Open Data in Science and ‘Is It Open Data?’ Web Service

We are pleased to announce the Panton Principles for Open Data in Science: http://www.pantonprinciples.org/ From the preamble: Science is based on building on, reusing and openly criticising the published body of scientific knowledge. For science to effectively function, and for society to reap the full benefits from scientific endeavours, it is crucial that science data […]

Clear Climate Code, and Data

The following guest post is by David Jones who is, among other things, a curator of the climate data group on CKAN (the OKF’s open source registry of open data) and co-founder of Clear Climate Code (which we blogged about back in 2008). Clear Climate Code have been working on ccc-gistemp, a project to reimplement […]

Climate Change, Climate Sceptics and Open Data

With the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen starting on Monday, it is of vital important that there is consensus on the scientific evidence about climate change, in order to inform debates about the best course of action for the international community. Sharing the same basic picture about the climate, global warming and the […]

Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2010: Call for Proposals

The Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2010 Call for Proposals is now open! We would be grateful for help in circulating the call to relevant lists and communities! You can reuse or point to: This blog post Main CFP page Plain text announce (wrapped at 72 characters) Identi.ca post Twitter post Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2010: […]

2nd Communia Workshop, Torino

Just over a week ago was the 2nd Communia Workshop, which took place in Turin. The theme was ‘Global Science and the Economics of Knowledge-Sharing Institutions’ – and there was a great line up of scientists, economists, and legal scholars, as well as representatives from various research bodies and NGOs. Papers, slides and audio will […]

Virtual meeting for Working Group on Open Data in Science

Next Tuesday 2nd June the Working Group on Open Data in Science will have their first meeting. While the meeting will focus on the Working Group’s activities, anyone is welcome to participate. Details are as follows: When: 2nd June 2009, 1600 GMT Where: #okfn IRC channel on oftc.net (you can connect via Mibbit) Wiki: http://wiki.okfn.org/wg/science/1 […]

Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2009: Saturday 28th March

Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2009 will take place next Saturday 28th March – less than a week away! where: Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, UCL, London when: 28th March 2009, 1030-1830 home: http://www.okfn.org/okcon/ register: http://www.okfn.org/okcon/register/ If you plan to attend, and haven’t registered yet – we encourage you to book your ticket now as space […]

Working Group on Open Data in Science

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new Working Group on Open Data in Science. In the first instance, the group will aim to: Act as a central point of reference and support for people who think they are interested in open data in science. Identify practices of early adopters, collecting data and […]

Public Interest Information Policy in Germany

I was recently asked to write a piece for Berlin-based think tank Das Progressive Zentrum on public interest information policy in Germany: Wem gehört das Wissen? Informationspolitik in Deutschland (Shorter German version) Public Interest Information Policy in Germany (Longer English version) The piece finishes with three policy suggestions: Support legislation as well as licensing and […]

Comments on the Science Commons Protocol for Implementing Open Access Data

Here I briefly comment on the Science Commons Protocol for Implementing Open Access Data as the protocol strongly advocates a position of ‘PD’-only. As will be apparent from the earlier essay on Open Data: Openness and Licensing I do not entirely share this view. The Protocol gives 3 basic reasons for preferring the ‘PD’ approach […]

Facts and Databases

[This post is an addendum to the earlier essay on Open Data: Openness and Licensing] It is important to be clear that any IP ‘rights’ in data(bases) are not ‘rights’ in the facts those data represent but in the ‘data collection’ (or database). Here I try to explain the difference (fairly crudely) with some examples. […]

Open Data: Openness and Licensing

Why does this matter? Why bother about openness and licensing for data? After all they don’t matter in themselves: what we really care about are things like the progress of human knowledge or the freedom to understand and share. However, open data is crucial to progress on these more fundamental items. It’s crucial because open […]

After the Workshop on Open Scientific Resources

The Workshop on Finding and Re-using Open Scientific Resources (cf. last week’s announce) took place on Saturday at the London Knowledge Lab. The day started with a discussion of various aspects of openness in educational and research materials – alluding to open access, open data and the Open Knowledge Definition. This was followed by brainstorming […]

Workshop on Finding and Re-using Open Scientific Resources, Saturday 8th November

As we announced earlier this month, tomorrow is our Workshop on Finding and Re-using Open Scientific Resources. As a concrete outcome of the workshop, we hope to add more open scientific resources to CKAN, as we did last Saturday in the Workshop on Public Information and which we’ve blogged about in the past. So far, […]

Workshop on Finding and Re-using Open Scientific Resources, 8th November 2008

We’re pleased to announce another OKF workshop in London this November – on ‘Finding and Re-using Open Scientific Resources’. As a concrete outcome of the workshop, we hope to add more open scientific resources to CKAN, which is something we’ve blogged about in the past. Details of the workshop are as follows: When: Saturday 8th […]

Clearer Climate Code

GISTEMP is a crucial open data set, because it contains the historical global temperature record. Not very important right now, but in the medium term absolutely vital for the continuing functioning of our society given the likelihood of adverse climate change. Stations that measure temperature naturally do so at specific points in space, and the […]

New Open Science Mailing List

After discussions with Cameron Neylon of Open Wetware and Kaitlin Thaney of Science Commons we’ve set up an open science mailing list: http://lists.okfn.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/open-science As far as we could tell, there wasn’t a general mailing list for people interested open science. Hence the new list aims cover this gap, and to strengthen and consolidate the open […]

Interview with Science Commons for their Voices from the Future of Science

Science Commons in the person of Donna Wentworth have done an interview with me as part of their series on “Voices from the Future of Science”. Among other things, I talked about what we can learn from the open source movement (Debian of Data anyone), current status and future plans for CKAN, and why we […]