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Extended: Open Data Scoping Terms of Reference

Heather Leson - December 31, 2013 in Open Data, Open Data Partnership For Development

The Open Data Partnership for Development Scoping Terms of Reference deadline has been extended until January 13, 2014. We have received some great submissions and want to give more people the best opportunity to tackle the project. Truly, we recognize that the holiday season is a busy time.

The Open Data Partnership for Development Scoping Terms of Reference opened on December 11, 2013 and will close on January 13, 2014 at 17:00 GMT.

Updated Open Data Partnership for Development – Scoping Terms of Reference

Help us get a current state Open Data Activity snapshot to guide our decisions for the Open Data Partnership for Development programmes. Proposals for a Scoping Analysis will address two objectives:

  • (i) identify potential funders and the key delivery partners in the Open Data ecosystem, and
  • (ii) map the existing efforts to support open data in developing countries and their status.

More about Open Data Partnership for Development

Happy New Year.

A report from the Ibrahim Governance Weekend

Mark Wainwright - December 13, 2013 in Events, Open Data Partnership For Development

Early last month I was in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation‘s annual governance weekend, including the celebrated Ibrahim Forum. The MIF, headed by the eponymous and irrepressible Mo, does amazing work promoting good governance in Africa. It’s perhaps best known for its incredibly comprehensive Governance Index.

Despite the terrible score of his native Somalia on his own Governance Index, Mo is much keener on celebrating all that is young and joyful and promising in Africa than telling dismal stories about its problems. Which is why the weekend began on a Friday evening in Addis Ababa stadium, with an exhibition football match between a local side and the continent’s most feared team, TP Mazembe from the DRC — the visitors easily winning 3-1 — followed by a pop concert.

[IMG: Kumi Naidoo speaking]
Kumi Naidoo of Greenpeace speaking at the Ibrahim Forum

The more serious part of the weekend was a reception on Saturday evening, including a fun mixture of politics and music, and the forum itself on the Sunday with a series of high-quality panel discussions on directions for African development, governance, integration and security. This year’s meeting was in Addis Ababa, home of the African Union, to coincide with the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the AU’s founding (as the OAU) in 1963.

The MIF’s aim of good governance is, of course, very much aligned with the aims of the Open Knowledge Foundation. It was good to hear the importance of open data stressed by some of the speakers. Among others Trevor Manuel, minister in charge of the National Planning Commission in South Africa, made the point that the work of building stability must start with reliable, accessible statistics. The OKF will be increasing its involvement in the region through its involvement in the Open Data Partnership for Development, a partnership with the World Bank and the Open Data Institute to increase the amount and impact of Open Data in developing countries.

Though it was a flying visit, I did have time for a whistle-stop tour of Addis Ababa. In the National Museum of Ethiopia it was particularly exciting to see Lucy, the famous skeleton of a member of what may have been our earliest upright ancestor species, as well as the earliest known human remains. As H.E. Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, chair of the African Union Commission, said in her address, ‘Welcome home to Ethiopia – wherever in the world you are from, this is your home.’

Scoping Terms of Reference – Open Data Partnership For Development

Heather Leson - December 12, 2013 in Open Data Partnership For Development

What is the state of Open Data activities globally? Who is working on what and where? Where are opportunities to be fostered in the developing world?

The Open Data Partnership for Development is a partnership between The World Bank, Open Data Institute (ODI) and Open Knowledge Foundation. Initial funding of $1.25 million in the first year comes from The World Bank’s Development Grant Facility. We are actively seeking additional partners to join our efforts.

Update: The Open Data Partnership for Development Scoping Terms of Reference deadline has been changed to January 13, 2014.


Submit your Scoping Proposal today!

The ODP4D team seeks candidates to conduct a Scoping Terms of Reference. Help us get a current state Open Data Activity snapshot to guide our decisions for the Open Data Partnership for Development programmes. Proposals for a Scoping Analysis will address two objectives: (i) identify potential funders and the key delivery partners in the Open Data ecosystem, and (ii) map the existing efforts to support open data in developing countries and their status.

The Scoping Terms of Reference (tender) is open from today until January 14, 2014 17:00 GMT:

UPDATED: Open Data Partnership for Development: Scoping Terms of Reference

School of Data - Training Curriculum Sprint

School of Data – Training Curriculum Sprint

In the meantime, the ODP4D team is preparing training programmes for governments, civil society organizations and partners. This scoping exercise will inform all the programme outputs. We can’t wait to get started! Please contact us for more details.

See previous Open Data Partnership for Development posts:

Dispatch: Crisismappers Community needs Data Makers

Heather Leson - November 25, 2013 in Data Journalism, Events, Open Data and My Data, Open Data Partnership For Development, WG Open Government Data, Workshop

What does open data / open knowledge have to do with Crisismapping? Everything. In times of crisis, we live in open data / open government ecosystem. We seek, build and make it happen in real time – talk converts to action quickly.

On Tuesday, November 19th, the School of Data hosted a full day pre-conference training session as part of the International Conference of Crisis Mappers Conference (ICCM) in Nairobi, Kenya. The full event hosted over 110 attendees from around the world for a training offering with Knowledge/Research, Maps to Data and Mobile/Security. The Crisismappers community brings humanitarians, governmental staff, civil society practitioners, researchers, and technologists in a common, equal space. Participants work on projects ranging from human rights, anti-corruption, humanitarian response and economic development in post-conflict zones. The brilliance of cross-sector community focused on using data for their work highlights the importance that Open Knowledge Foundation as an member of the greater network. Building a global network of data makers is a one-by-one task. Our goal is to have leaders train their colleagues thus widening a circle of sharing and collaboration.

Some recent examples of our communities connecting include: Open Spending Tree Map by Donor: Foreign Aid Transparency – Faith (Philippines) and Early Results – Micromappers Yolanda (uses Crowdcrafting which was incubated at OKFN Labs).

Baking Soda with Crisis Mappers

Steve and School of Data

(Steve Kenei, Development Initiatives)

Data is just a word until we activate it. I like to call the School of Data the “Baking Soda” team. Together with key ingredients (community, problem/issue description, data sets and tool menus), they work with others to make data usable and actionable.

School of Data in session (School of Data session at ihub for ICCM)

The data track workshop sessions including using spreadsheets, cleaning data, data visualization and how to geocode. Some folks stayed in this track all day, even skipping breaks. The track started with a spreadsheet training delivered by Steve Kenei from Development Initiatives, continued with an Introduction to OpenRefine and an introduction to data visualization by Agnes Rube of Internews Kenya. The track was finished by School of Data mentor Ketty Adoch. The workshop was designed to address issues that civil society organizations have using data. One of the exciting results was the sheer concentration and intent of participants. They skipped breaks and even brought their own datasets to guide their learning.

Communities, Ideas connecting:

Ketty Adour, Fruits of Thought

Ketty Adour, Fruits of Thought

The ICCM conference, including pre-conference events, was jam packed week of maps, data, research and technology. Most of the ignite talks and panels referred to some stage of open data needs or the issues ranging from data ethics, data quality and data collection methodology. Ketty Adour – one of this years ICCM fellows – she shared her experiences on building a community mapping in Uganda using OpenStreetMap at Fruits of Thought.

Next Steps

During the self-organized sessions, together with Luis Capelo of UN OCHA , I hosted a discussion about Open Data Opportunities and Challenges. It was an exercise for the attendees to discuss Open Data and Crisismapping.

We determined a few concrete actions for the community:

  • A common data sharing space for Crisismappers interested in Humanitarian data.
  • A Crisismappers Open Data Working Group to help share impact and build momentum.
  • Training and a mentorship programs to help build skills and leadership in the field.

The Crisismappers community is over 5000 members strong with a mailing list, webinar and NING site. Do consider joining this vibrant community of maps and data makers who are at the edge of what it takes to unite policy with sheer determined actions. Also see our various Working Groups and the Open Data Partnership for Development programme.

Some additional resources:

Taking it Global @ OGP

Heather Leson - October 29, 2013 in Featured, Open Data Partnership For Development

Activating an Open Data Movement means building beyond the topics of ‘why open data?’ and ‘open data index’. We also need to dig into the ‘how?’ we get there globally. Since the Open Data Partnership for Development (ODP4D) was launched at OKCon we have been busy working behind the scenes planning the programme.

The Open Data Partnership for Development is between The World Bank, Open Data Institute and Open Knowledge Foundation. We have three key goals:

  1. support developing countries to plan, execute and run open data initiatives;
  2. increase re-use of open data in developing countries;
  3. and grow the base of evidence on the impact of open data for development.

Data Expedition (3)
School of Data Expedition, OKCON (September 2013)

Seeking Supporters and Partners

Both Open Data Institute and Open Knowledge Foundation will deliver programming to bolster existing community work and to support leaders. Building on each of our strengths, we will connect governments, businesses, civil society organizations and citizens. This means learning from those who are actively working with open data in key areas around the world. Our goal is to foster leadership with support, tools and training. The best part about this project is that it will be shaped by the people who are already using open data to to strengthen networks, build community and advocate for change. We are seeking new partners to help us build the momentum and strengthen our programming.

We want to hear from you about your work and how you can contribute to the Open Data Partnership for Development. As we build out our plans, our goal is to help you get involved and learn more about our upcoming work. Please get in touch.

See you at Open Government Partnership Summit

If you are attending the Open Government Partnership Summit we will be available to discuss partnerships and details of the programme. The Open Data Institute and Open Knowledge Foundation teams will also be hosting Office Hours on Thursday, October 31st at 17:15 – 18:45 pm in the Festival Space (3rd Floor).

Contact us and more details

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